Bathrooms, Interiors

Love Your Bathroom Again (Part 2: The Shower)

How’s your February going?  It’s been so snowy here in Denver!  Usually our snow melts when the sun comes back out the next day after a storm but we have snow in our yard that has been there since THANKSGIVING.  That’s a first in the 16 years we’ve lived in the Denver area.  We have ice dams in our gutters like the ones in Chevy Chase’s Christmas Vacation.  But, enough of me complaining to you.

Wait!  I spoke to soon. I’m not done complaining yet.  This is Part 2 of my True Design Confessional about my early dislike of bathroom design.  I enjoy working on bathrooms now – but here are the roots of what I don’t love about bathrooms.  Last week it was the enormous, Titanic-like bathtub rising up on sharp edged, tiled stairs like a harbinger of doom and this week it’s the tile in showers.

I also don’t like small bands of accent tile.  To me, they look too small, too busy and just not enough and they are everywhere in a certain age of remodel.  I don’t like the enormous, frameless mirrors (although big mirrors are coming back) and I (it gets weird here), I don’t like all the tile.  It’s a bathroom – it gets wet!  I know, I still don’t like all the tile (check out my post on paneling in the bathroom).

Combine vast wastelands of tile with huge panes of glass, large expanses of generic mirror, bands of mosaic glass and stone tile running around the room and you have a room where I don’t feel comfortable.  What I’m trying to tell you is that the bathrooms of the 1990’s and early 2000’s have ruined me and even though none of what I described is in style now, I see it in client’s homes all the time.

Okay you maniac – what kind of showers do you like?  Here are a few that I am digging right now and I’ll also break down the luxury items that my clients are putting into their showers right now.

Run Your Floor Tile Up One Wall in the Shower

wood in the bathroom
There’s a lot of wall tile here – more than anyone would ever need, but it’s softened by the natural wood and the natural light. I like the floor tile that was taken up the wall in the shower. That’s a favorite design trick of mine too. It keeps things consistent. (Photo Source)

Put Your Accent Tile on An Entire Wall:

This has been a trend for the past 3 years or so and I like it!

marble bathroom
Here’s a great example of using an accent tile on an entire wall. Anyone within the sound of my voice – please feel empowered to go big with your accent tile.  I also love the window in the shower. (Photo Source)

Rain Head or Not to Rain Head?

The above shower has a hand held sprayer (which almost all of my clients put in) and a rain head (which just a few of my clients put in).  Rain heads come with light therapy now and other fancy features but they look so odd in the ads – it’s always a black bathroom with fluorescent pink and white light coming from the shower head.

led rain head
A little strange, right? It looks the opposite of relaxing to me, but I see ads for these all the time in the Kitchen and Bath magazines.

Body Sprays

Almost all of my clients who are into the shower experience go with body sprays.  Delta sells some that are pretty affordable as does Brizo.

brizo body spray
What I like about Brizo’s body sprays is that they retract back into the wall. (Photo Source)
body sprays luxury shower
Here’s a shower with it all: Rain head, hand held, steam, body sprays and an unbelievable view. (Photo Source)
Curbless shower
Here’s a curbless shower with an entire wall of mermaid tiles. I’m not sure what’s going on on the other side of the shower – but from here it’s massive. (Photo Source)
Here’s another mermaid tile accent wall. This one has a rain head and might be a steam shower because the glass goes up to the ceiling. (Photo Source)

Steam Showers in Arid Climates

I don’t know if they are as popular in humid climates, but out here in our arid, high desert climate, a luxury shower has a steam unit.  My clients like to put essential oil in the unit and a favorite brand is Thermasol.

double shower
Here’s a shower that’s slightly bigger than the average person’s hall bathroom. Do you see the linear drain at the base of the niche wall? That’s also a key component in a luxury bathroom. They are very pricey so I don’t have a lot of my clients putting these in. (Photo Source)
Teak floor in the shower
Wow, right? Floor to ceiling herringbone? Teak flooring? A paned, brass and glass shower enclosure? I’ll take it! (Photo Source)

“Somebody just gave me a shower radio. Thanks a lot. Do you really want music in the shower? I guess there’s no better place to dance than a slick surface next to a glass door.”
Jerry Seinfeld

 

 

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “Love Your Bathroom Again (Part 2: The Shower)”

  1. I’ve got to say that those linear drains are the absolute pits. All the gunk builds up and up and you have to prize it out with a coathanger… just saying.
    Give me the old fashioned circular drain anytime.

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